Of the some eighty or so books I read in 2016, these were my favorites.

In no particular order…

***

1

News of the World by Paulette Jiles (October 4, 2016)

In the aftermath of the American Civil War, an aging itinerant news reader agrees to transport a young captive of the Kiowa back to her people in this morally complex, multi-layered novel of historical fiction from the author of Enemy Women that explores the boundaries of family, responsibility, honor, and trust.

Captain Jefferson Kyle Kidd travels through northern Texas, giving live readings from newspapers to paying audiences hungry for news of the world. An elderly widower who has lived through three wars and fought in two of them, the captain enjoys his rootless, solitary existence.

In Wichita Falls, he is offered a $50 gold piece to deliver a young orphan to her relatives in San Antonio. Four years earlier, a band of Kiowa raiders killed Johanna’s parents and sister; sparing the little girl, they raised her as one of their own. Recently rescued by the U.S. army, the ten-year-old has once again been torn away from the only home she knows.

Their 400-mile journey south through unsettled territory and unforgiving terrain proves difficult and at times dangerous. Johanna has forgotten the English language, tries to escape at every opportunity, throws away her shoes, and refuses to act “civilized.” Yet as the miles pass, the two lonely survivors tentatively begin to trust each other, forming a bond that marks the difference between life and death in this treacherous land.

A quick and compelling read, I finished this book in a single day.  The relationship at the heart of this western drives a narrative at turns spirited, humorous, and incredibly touching.  Unforgettable.

***

1

Hex by Thomas Olde Heuvelt (April 26, 2016)

Welcome to Black Spring, the seemingly picturesque Hudson Valley town haunted by the Black Rock Witch, a seventeenth century woman whose eyes and mouth are sewn shut. Muzzled, she walks the streets and enters homes at will. She stands next to children’s bed for nights on end. Everybody knows that her eyes may never be opened or the consequences will be too terrible to bear.

The elders of Black Spring have virtually quarantined the town by using high-tech surveillance to prevent their curse from spreading. Frustrated with being kept in lockdown, the town’s teenagers decide to break their strict regulations and go viral with the haunting. But, in so doing, they send the town spiraling into dark, medieval practices of the distant past.

Oh, this one’s a weird one.  Delightfully so.

***

1

On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King (October 3, 1999)

Part memoir, part master class by one of the bestselling authors of all time, this superb volume is a revealing and practical view of the writer’s craft, comprising the basic tools of the trade every writer must have. King’s advice is grounded in his vivid memories from childhood through his emergence as a writer, from his struggling early career to his widely reported near-fatal accident in 1999—and how the inextricable link between writing and living spurred his recovery. 

The world’s most accomplished author of contemporary fiction delivers the best book on the craft of writing. 

***

1

 The Regional Office is Under Attack! by Manuel Gonzales (April 12, 2016)

In a world beset by amassing forces of darkness, one organization—the Regional Office—and its coterie of super-powered female assassins protects the globe from annihilation. At its helm, the mysterious Oyemi and her oracles seek out new recruits and root out evil plots. Then a prophecy suggests that someone from inside might bring about its downfall. And now, the Regional Office is under attack.

Super-charged madness here.  I hear a movie is already in the works. 

***

1

Seinfeldia: How a Show About Nothing Changed Everything by Jennifer Keishin Armstrong

In Seinfeldia, acclaimed TV historian and entertainment writer Jennifer Keishin Armstrong celebrates the creators and fans of this American television phenomenon, bringing readers behind-the-scenes of the show while it was on the air and into the world of devotees for whom it never stopped being relevant, a world where the Soup Nazi still spends his days saying “No soup for you!”, Joe Davola gets questioned every day about his sanity, Kenny Kramer makes his living giving tours of New York sights from the show, and fans dress up in Jerry’s famous puffy shirt, dance like Elaine, and imagine plotlines for Seinfeld if it were still on TV.

If you’re a fan of the show, you’ll love this book.  I am and I did.

***

1

The Lesser Dead by Christopher Buehlman (October 7, 2014)

New York City in 1978 is a dirty, dangerous place to live. And die. Joey Peacock knows this as well as anybody—he has spent the last forty years as an adolescent vampire, perfecting the routine he now enjoys: womanizing in punk clubs and discotheques, feeding by night, and sleeping by day with others of his kind in the macabre labyrinth under the city’s sidewalks.

The subways are his playground and his highway, shuttling him throughout Manhattan to bleed the unsuspecting in the Sheep Meadow of Central Park or in the backseats of Checker cabs, or even those in their own apartments who are too hypnotized by sitcoms to notice him opening their windows. It’s almost too easy.

Until one night he sees them hunting on his beloved subway. The children with the merry eyes. Vampires, like him…or not like him. Whatever they are, whatever their appearance means, the undead in the tunnels of Manhattan are not as safe as they once were.

And neither are the rest of us.

I’m not a fan of vampire fiction but this book totally upended my expectations.  The sequel was recently released and I’ve already purchased a digital copy.

***

1

Company Town by Madeline Ashby (May 17, 2016)

Meet Hwa. One of the few in her community to forego bio-engineered enhancements, she’s the last truly organic person left on the rig. But she’s an expert in the arts of self-defence, and she’s been charged with training the Family’s youngest, who has been receiving death threats – seemingly from another timeline.

Meanwhile, a series of interconnected murders threatens the city’s stability – serial killer? Or something much, much worse…?

One hell of a cool read.

***

1

The Sudden Appearance of Hope by Claire North (May 17, 2016)

My name is Hope Arden, and you won’t know who I am. We’ve met before – a thousand times. But I am the girl the world forgets.

It started when I was sixteen years old. A slow declining, an isolation, one piece at a time.

A father forgetting to drive me to school. A mother setting the table for three, not four. A teacher who forgets to chase my missing homework. A friend who looks straight through me and sees a stranger.

No matter what I do, the words I say, the people I hurt, the crimes I commit – you will never remember who I am.

That makes my life tricky. But it also makes me dangerous . . .

North (aka Catherine Webb) is the author of The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August and Touch, both of which made my Top Reads list in previous years.  I look forward to her next book making it 4 for 4.

***

1

The Flicker Men by Ted Kosmatka (July 21, 2015)

Eric Argus is a washout. His prodigious early work clouded his reputation and strained his sanity. But an old friend gives him another chance, an opportunity to step back into the light.

With three months to produce new research, Eric replicates the paradoxical double-slit experiment to see for himself the mysterious dual nature of light and matter. A simple but unprecedented inference blooms into a staggering discovery about human consciousness and the structure of the universe.

His findings are celebrated and condemned in equal measure. But no one can predict where the truth will lead. And as Eric seeks to understand the unfolding revelations, he must evade shadowy pursuers who believe he knows entirely too much already.

Smart, provocative SF.

***

1

Beyond Redemption by Michael H. Fletcher

Faith shapes the landscape, defines the laws of physics, and makes a mockery of truth. Common knowledge isn’t an axiom, it’s a force of nature. What the masses believe is. But insanity is a weapon, conviction a shield. Delusions give birth to foul new gods.

Violent and dark, the world is filled with the Geisteskranken—men and women whose delusions manifest, twisting reality. High Priest Konig seeks to create order from chaos. He defines the beliefs of his followers, leading their faith to one end: a young boy, Morgen, must Ascend to become a god. A god they can control.

But there are many who would see this would-be-god in their thrall, including the High Priest’s own Doppels, and a Slaver no one can resist. Three reprobates—The Greatest Swordsman in the World, a murderous Kleptic, and possibly the only sane man left—have their own nefarious plans for the young god.

As these forces converge on the boy, there’s one more obstacle: time is running out. When one’s delusions become more powerful, they become harder to control. The fate of the Geisteskranken is to inevitably find oneself in the Afterdeath.

The question, then, is: Who will rule there?

This wildly imaginative novel was my favorite book of 2015.  The sequel was released in November and is also on my to-read pile.

***

1

Then We Came to the End by Joshua Ferris (February 26, 2008)

No one knows us quite the same way as the men and women who sit beside us in department meetings and crowd the office refrigerator with their labeled yogurts. Every office is a family of sorts, and the ad agency Joshua Ferris brilliantly depicts in his debut novel is family at its strangest and best, coping with a business downturn in the time-honored way: through gossip, pranks, and increasingly frequent coffee breaks.

With a demon’s eye for the details that make life worth noticing, Joshua Ferris tells a true and funny story about survival in life’s strangest environment–the one we pretend is normal five days a week.

If you like your humor pitch dark, then Ferris is the author for you.  Also check out his most recent To Rise Again at a Decent Hour.  

***

1

The Traitor Baru Cormorant by Seth Dickinson (September 15, 2015)

Tomorrow, on the beach, Baru Cormorant will look up from the sand of her home and see red sails on the horizon.

The Empire of Masks is coming, armed with coin and ink, doctrine and compass, soap and lies. They’ll conquer Baru’s island, rewrite her culture, criminalize her customs, and dispose of one of her fathers. But Baru is patient. She’ll swallow her hate, prove her talent, and join the Masquerade. She will learn the secrets of empire. She’ll be exactly what they need. And she’ll claw her way high enough up the rungs of power to set her people free.

In a final test of her loyalty, the Masquerade will send Baru to bring order to distant Aurdwynn, a snakepit of rebels, informants, and seditious dukes. Aurdwynn kills everyone who tries to rule it. To survive, Baru will need to untangle this land’s intricate web of treachery – and conceal her attraction to the dangerously fascinating Duchess Tain Hu.

But Baru is a savant in games of power, as ruthless in her tactics as she is fixated on her goals. In the calculus of her schemes, all ledgers must be balanced, and the price of liberation paid in full.

A brilliant entry in the fantasy genre, full of twists, turns, and unforgettable characters.

***

1

Under the Harrow by Flynn Berry (June 14, 2016)

When Nora takes the train from London to visit her sister in the countryside, she expects to find her waiting at the station, or at home cooking dinner. But when she walks into Rachel’s familiar house, what she finds is entirely different: her sister has been the victim of a brutal murder.

Stunned and adrift, Nora finds she can’t return to her former life. An unsolved assault in the past has shaken her faith in the police, and she can’t trust them to find her sister’s killer. Haunted by the murder and the secrets that surround it, Nora is under the harrow: distressed and in danger. As Nora’s fear turns to obsession, she becomes as unrecognizable as the sister her investigation uncovers.

A riveting read.  The best thriller since Gone Girl.

***

1

Mongrels by Stephen Graham Jones

He was born an outsider, like the rest of his family. Poor yet resilient, he lives in the shadows with his Aunt Libby and Uncle Darren, folk who stubbornly make their way in a society that does not understand or want them. They are mongrels, mixedblood, neither this nor that. The boy at the center of Mongrels must decide if he belongs on the road with his aunt and uncle, or if he fits with the people on the other side of the tracks.

For ten years, he and his family have lived a life of late-night exits and close calls—always on the move across the South to stay one step ahead of the law. But the time is drawing near when Darren and Libby will know if their nephew is like them or not. And the close calls they’ve been running from for so long are catching up fast, now. Everything is about to change.

A surprisingly fresh take on the werewolf tale.  

***

Honorable Mentions

Sweetbitter by Stephanie Danier

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead

The Family Plot by Cherie Priest

Ninefox Gambit by Yoon Ha Lee

I Am Providence by Nick Mamatas

Mr. Splitfoot by Samantha Hunt

Dark Run by Mike Brooks

***

Hey!  Two of Akemi’s three special-order Christmas gifts were waiting for us on our return to Toronto this afternoon…

img_5556 img_5557

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KathyC

Aww great presents!

I realized today that I am pretty sure I’m pretty close to meeting the goal I set for myself here, last Jan 1st. I went through your archives to be sure.

Jan 1, 2015 I posted the following comment:

“I don’t make resolutions, since I never stick to them. But I think this year I may make an exception…to try to make your most prolific commenter list for 2016! I’m not sure I can keep up with the activity level of #1 ponytail, but I sure will try for spots 2-5!!

I’ve only got one book my list at the moment for 2016, it’s a long one and I start a new job on Monday. We’ll see how long it takes me to read it. Dragonfly in Amber by Diana Gabaldon, in prep for season 2 of Outlander on Starz!”

Well, I did read Dragonfly in Amber, and am almost done re-reading Voyager in preparation for season 3.

As for making a spot in 2-5….well, I’ll just have to wait and see! If you feel like procrastinating writing a bit more, you have my permission to do so for this one reason only. If you want. And it’s not too much work. Now that you are not using cell data anymore to do blog stuff. But if you can’t, that’s okay. I understand. Writing is more important.

But even if I didn’t make the top 5…I actually did post every single day. So I have officially moved from lurker to regular. And I’m proud of that!

Kathy

Maggie L80
Maggie L80

Great portraits!! Love the aviator cap, goggles, and scarf. Bow ties are cool!

Glad you made it home safely.

Ponytail
Ponytail

Love the art work! Glad you had a safe trip home. Did your mom fix a huge spread while you were visiting? I missed seeing a picture of all her specialties.

gildermcc
gildermcc

NEWS OF THE WORLD sounds interesting; I’ve made that 400-mile trip a couple of times.

PBMom

@KathyC You just never know. I was surprised I made the list somewhere last year. Especially with my irregular blog-reading habits (as Joe calls me ‘binge-blogger.” Its true for me though–but I like the sound of blog-regular more. I’d rather my “binge” habits be for Netflix.

Those portraits are outstanding. What an awesome gift. Can’t wait to see the third one.

Tammy Dixon
Tammy Dixon

No resolutions for me this year. 2017 will be bringing some bad things. Unless Dr Jo has some kind of miracle break through, I don’t see her living through it.

Plus, my brother has throat cancer. He’s been a heavy drug user since his teens, so I’m actually surprised he’s lived this long. Due to being high or something and in a bad accident a few years ago, he’s pretty much a teenager mentally. He’s not really understanding that he’ll have to quit smoking (don’t see that happening) or even that he needs treatment. However, I’m more worried about how my mom will deal with process.

Enough of the bummer stuff! Love, love, love when you post book recommendations. I’ll take a looksee and see if there is anything that gives me a tingle.

Line Noise: I’m not sure how you managed all that change but I bet it’s good to be home again! Good luck with the new job!

PBmom: As always, you astound me with how much you get done. I pray the new year brings good things for you, Jeff and Patrick!

Drea: Don’t you get any time off? wink Hope your mom is well!

Good luck with your new job too Kathy C!

Those paintings are so cute!!!!!!

Margaret Clayton

The portraits are exceptional, I love them! I splurged last year and got a Cuddle Clone plush copy of my Oide who we lost last in 2015. Pet memories are so wonderful.

I am still working on the same book from 2014, but I notice reading is going more smoothly now. I plan on taking it on the plane with me, and see if I can finish it on our trip to Maui. (See how I snuck that in?) My goals this year are to read another book, and then another, find exercise I can do with this stupid scar, build up stamina by walking or by working in front of my Wii, and to get back on the CICO calorie counting routine, which I hate but it works. Paint, of course. Maybe do a small art project at the burns.

Margaret Clayton

@ PBMom … I hope all goes well with your knee and PT! Glad to hear you are making progress.

@Drea, thanks for the good wishes.

2cats

Yes! Really admire the portraits. Looks like oil or acrylic on canvas? Who is the artist? I’ve dabbled in oil painting and have tried to capture expressions, not too successfully. The artist definitely succeeded here.

Also glad you are all safely returned to your second home in Toronto.
Today is my last day of a long (for me) vacation. Tomorrow, back to work… blah.
At least it’s a short week.

Happy New Year to all and onward to more wonderful Dark Matter to come!

TheOtherOne
TheOtherOne

Tried really hard to read some fiction last year … failed miserably.
A number of these books here seem like they may tempt me though. Hmmm.

Love the portraits with Bubba Biggles the best!

TheOtherOne
TheOtherOne

New Years resolution

Write better English!

ceresis64

Happy New Year to each and all.
Its been a bit hectic here! Loved having the family together to celebrate the beginning of 2017 👍

Debra

Happy New Year.
Honestly, my idea of hell would be to be stuck in an isolated cabin with just your listed top books. I saw 2 i might read out of sheer boredom… the rest I’d use for lighting fires maybe. You really like stress, don’t you?

I’m about to start reading Harlequin romances or something. Life’s too stressful, the zombie apocalypse looks appealing compared to the US right now, and I don’t fancy any stressful reading. Dystopia stuff has lost its appeal.

PBMom

@TamDixon I’m SO sorry to hear about your brother. My mother was a smoker. She got lung cancer in March that they found on a routine x-ray for back pain. She did a lot of bargaining with God on this issue. It was too late though. She died in August of that same year. It’s such an addictive substance and so difficult to stop. I hope he does stop, but that will be up to him. I know you’ll support them both in every way you can because that is just who you are.

KathyC

A few titles have been added to my library wish list:

Under the Harrow
News of the World
The Sudden Appearance of Hope
Touch
The Fifteen Lives of Harry August

shinyhula
shinyhula

Thanks for the tips on great reads, my Kindle has become slackjawed from the amount of PvZ played on it (the sound of chomping zombies irks me something fierce). I’ll be checking these out on these especially gray winter days with the awesome new fleece throw I got for Christmas. I’m still stuck on Travelers, which I plan to watch to get hints on Season 2.

Ponytail
Ponytail

My new years resolution is to comment at least once per day on your blog.