I’d like to kick off today’s entry by announcing the winner of our very first Caption This contest. The winner was chosen by none other than the awkwardly pictured party himself: Carl Binder. Thanks to everyone who took the time send in their captions. There were a lot of great ones – and a few that had me scratching my heads wondering whether some of you had been drinking.
 
Anyhow, drumroll please….
 
In third place, DougIndy with a nice call-back:   

“There is a producer standing here with wet hands”
“There is a producer standing here with wet hands”

 Second place goes to K-Man for:

Pretty fly for a white guy
Pretty fly for a white guy

And taking the first place crown is JES with his winning caption:

Jonathan Livingston Binder
Jonathan Livingston Binder

DougIndy and K-Man win bragging rights!  JES wins…er…something else.  I haven’t decided quite what yet.  But drop the Baron an email (BaronDestructo@yahoo.com) and you can discuss.

Well, I had only planned on finishing up Act IV of Script #2 today but, as expected, got on a roll and ended up sailing through Act V to finish the darn thing. The second script is a robust 53 pages (52 full) and contains what is, without a doubt, the biggest HOLY #%&@! ending I have ever written. I mean, I knew what was going to happen but, as I was writing toward it and the different pieces of the story were falling into place, I decided to go with a little something different in the lead-up and…well…it’s quite the eyebrow-raiser. Actually, the double eyebrow-raiser. Hell, the truth is, you don’t have enough eyebrows to make it work. Trust me.
 
So, now I have two rough drafts. Tonight, I shift gears to reading two first drafts Lawren sent my way – Marty’s G.‘s Lost, and Carl’s latest oeuvre, Pain. Tomorrow, I start work on streamlining my two scripts, getting the all important timing down, adjusting the scenes, tweaking the dialogue, and generally just making sure it all makes sense. The plan was to put them out on Monday but, given that I’m so ahead of schedule, I may aim for a pre-weekend release.
Let’s celebrate with some pics: 

IMG_1801x

Qu'est-ce que c'est? indeed.
Qu’est-ce que c’est? indeed.
Bet you always wanted one of these.
Bet you always wanted one of these.

 I’d like to finish off with some discussion of this month’s book of the month club selection: The Speed of Dark.  And a gentle reminder to post your questions for author Elizabeth Moon before week’s end.

Sylvia writes: “Not far into the book, I began to feel anxious for Lou…waiting for the shoe, the other shoe, etc., to drop because we know how mean, cruel people are/can be. And, the “child like” innocence and trust seemed quite vulnerable. “

Answer: What I found particularly interesting was the fact that, despite his skills in pattern recognition, Lou was unable to figure out who was behind the acts of vandalism directed against him.  Rather, he works it all out in his head and yet refuses to accept the logical conclusion because allows his emotions and sense of right and wrong to overrule the obvious answer. 

Sylvia also writes: “The ending was good, but it did not feel exactly right. Perhaps my overly critical view of the people performing the experimental procedure biased me. So, now, we see where the procedure worked and apparently worked well.”

Answer: I think that the ending will be the point of contention for many.  Does Lou achieve his goal and is it a victory or does he abandon who he was and is it really, in some sense, a defeat for the character and all he represents?

Shelly writes: “The characters were noble, to me, as they struggled with the sudden possibility of being like the majority of people and there is no one right decision to make.”

Answer: That’s what I loved about this book.  It presents a complex issue but doesn’t offer up any easy answers, allowing the reader to draw their own conclusions.  Whether the decision (in the grander sense) was the right one or the wrong one is up for debate – EXCEPT in the case of one of the project’s participants who is referred to only in briefly passing at book’s end: “Bailey, in particular, made a juicy tidbit for the media. I didn’t know how badly it went for im until I saw the news archives; they never let us see him.”  I wonder what did happen to Bailey?  Did he remain in an arrested childlike state?  Or were the effects even worse?  He’s the only one who rolled the dice and you could say with certainty lost out.

Charlie’s Angel writes: “The Speed of Dark is one of my favorite books.”

Answer: Had you read it before?  Did you read it again for this discussion?  If so, what did you think of it on second reading?

Thornyrose writes: “The same point of view strengthens our commitment to Lou as we can recognise how badly treated he is by certain characters in the story, from Dr. Fornum, to Crenshaw, all the way to Dr. Ransome, all of whom fail to recognise, or even acknowledge, Lou’s place in humanity.”

Answer: That’s a terrific point.  None of the aforementioned saw Lou as a person.  He was merely the means to an end for all of them.  I wonder whether a non-autistic person was in the same position would have received the same treatment.  Quite possibly yes in most cases, but I think they would have received a certain amount of respect that wasn’t afforded Lou.  These individuals didn’t little to hide their disdain and ulterior motives in front of Lou – which is ironic since Lou was in a better position than most people to pick up on this.

Thornyrose also writes: “There’s even the question of Don’s punishment for his crimes? Is it justice, or even mercy, to “adjust” a person’s mind?”

Answer: Yes, that was interesting, the parallel between the mind reformating that Don undergoes for his crime and the similar treatment Lou must undergo to become “normal”.  It’s interesting to note how, despite the fact that no one else had a problem with Don’s treatment and even argued for it, Lou was quite adamant in his belief that altering someone’s brain was wrong regardless of the desired outcome.  So it came as a shock when he ultimately decided to go ahead and have the procedure done.

Ponytail writes: “His only issues where sometimes having trouble communicating and handling emotions. Don’t we all?”

Answer: No argument here.  I reader some reader reviews after I finished the book and was surprised by how many people strongly related with Lou – to the point that some of them wondered whether they were “slightly autistic”.

Ponytail writes: “The new Lou seemed to be just seeing the surface – like “normal” people tend to do. Like “normal” people did with him.”

Answer: Yes, which is why I, personally, found the ending more tragic than hopeful. 

Ponytail also writes: “I guess it worked out the way Lou had wanted. I felt a loss. I’m don’t know why but the Epilogue made me cry. Maybe because I would not like this new Lou as much or maybe because I know he would not like me either. I don’t know.”
 
Answer: Or, quite frankly, because by book’s end, the Lou we know is gone and has been replaced by an inscrutable stranger.
Charles Schneider writes: “The only dissapointments I suffered were the threat of Lou’s villains, I never really felt that Lou would not ‘vanquish’ them. Don was just a man-child, and Mr. Crenshaw is excized off-screen in a deus-ex machina call from his boss, and in the end both become speed bumps in Lou’s life.”

Answer: In the case of Don, he was a pretty dangerous man-child, escalating from petty acts of vandalism to assault.  And I disagree that Mr. Crenshaw’s punshiment came as the result of some deus ex-machina.  His downfall is orchestrated by Pete Aldrin.  In fact, one of my favorite moments in the book comes when Lou arrives at the office to find a shell-shocked Crenshaw, boxed belongings in hand, being escorted out.
 Charles Schneider also writes: “I thought it was interesting that virtually everyone in Lou’s life after ‘the treatment’ virtually left the story as Lou set off on a whole new life. “Answer: Yes, interseting and incredibly sad.  He was no longer the Lou they knew and the new Lou no longer had an interest in maintaing a friendship with them.

Iamza writes: “It struck me as kind of ironic that the first thing Lou does after his treatment is sign up to be an astronaut, and travel to the stars, far away from all the normal people just like him. Is that what normal means?”

Answer: Interesting.  I never thought about it that way.  It’s ironic that he seemed warmer and more empathetic when he was autistic (given that many people with autism are considered remote and socially isolated) but seemed to embrace a solitary existence as a “normal”.

Iamza also writes: “I am somewhat torn on the notion of developing drugs and/or computer chips to regulate behaviour. I thought it was an interesting idea to raise: what if we could condition abnormal behaviour — make everyone normal, productive members of society. On the one hand, you would be able to get rid of anti-social behaviour like that of Don. On the other, who gets to decide what it means to be normal?”

Answer: The truth is this is a debate we should be having now at a time when drugs that alter brain chemistry are being prescribed to deal with everything from depression to attention deficit disorder.  I’m sure that they help in many cases, but what are some of the undiscussed drawbacks?

Light writes: “I agree with your review of the book, it was great. I have read elsewhere that it was the publishers that classified it as a scifi book, which may explain why it is under that, even though as pointed out above, it is more marginally a scifi.”

Answer: I’ve always found it interesting what tends to be classified and NOT classified as scifi.  The Road, for instance, is, in my opinion, SF, but many (including, if I’m not mistaken, even the author himself) do not consier it SF.  Compare this to Octavia E. Butler’s Parable of the Sower and Parable of the Talents which pretty much told the same story some 15 years earlier and IS classified as SF.  

Silver_comet writes: “All the other characters were well drawn, too. The only exception is Marjory. The reader didn’t learn much about her and her real feelings, the reasons behind them. That’s a pity, because for Lou she had an important part in his life.”

Answer: I think she was written this way to place us fully in Lou’s perspective.  Like him, we don’t know for certain whether she does or doesn’t like him in “that way”.  Rather than be allowed into her mind and know for sure, we share in Lou’s anxiety and doubt.   

Silver_comet also writes: “From Don’s point of view it’s so much easier to blame Lou for everything instead of himself. He was definitely a person who couldn’t take responsibility for his own actions. The question for me is, has anybody ever explained that to Don? Really, in a friendly way? Or did they just turn away and confirmed therefore his way of thinking?”

Answer: Hey, that’s a very interesting point.  Did the others contribute to Don’s descent by not showing him the kidness and respect they showed Lou.  Was there a double standard here?  I mean, having dealt with my share of jerks, I totally sympathized with them.  It’s hard to turn the other cheek or be understanding with an openly hostile individual.  I guess I’m guilty of it myself.

Silver_comet also writes: “I don’t have problems to socialize. However, I’m a person who needs much time for herself. Definitely more than most other people. Since I was a kid I have been happy being left alone for hours. It hasn’t changed much since then. I still like daydreaming. To immerse myself into the world of books, films and forget my actual surroundings. Sometimes I’m just not in the mood for talking and/or company. Is that bad?”

Answer: We’re very similar in this respect.  While I enjoy socializing, for the most part, when given the choice, I can’t be bothered and prefer to just stay at home with the dogs and just write or read.

Silver_comet writes: “It was different with Lou. The changes were forced, they happen suddenly and quite randomly – not because of events in his life. For example, maybe his feelings for Marjory would have changed anyway. Naturally. I just don’t feel comfortable with the way they have changed now.”

Answer: Agreed.  In some ways, this book reminded me of Flowers for Algernon.  But in reverse.  The shock of losing someone so dear and so suddenly stays with you.

Chevron7 writes: “I must say that I loved Lou’s internal monologue. I actually found it very comforting. In fact I was REALLY annoyed when the author switched to Tom’s or Pete’s POV.”

Answer: I agree.  While I realize it was necessary, I always found myself eager to return to Lou’s POV.

MikeB writes: “As one who has lived with Asbergers all my life, albeit undiagnosed for most of it, I read this story with great appreciation. It is a wonderful book.”Answer: Hey, Mike, were there certain aspects of the book that rang particularly true for you?  Were there some that didn’t?

Michelle writes: “At times I found myself wondering why I was so fascinated. I mean, the description of how Lou will replace four slashed tires goes on for pages, but I couldn’t stop reading them. “

Answer: Like you, I found Lou’s voice so engaging, his character so compelling, that I took my time with this book, truly appreciated it.  I have a feeling it’s one of those books I’ll be pulling out and rereading for some time to come.

 

Michelle also writes: “I missed Lou-before by the end, but I felt selfish for doing so. As beautiful a soul as he was before, he was not “happy” in my opinion. He was unsatisfied on many levels. And maybe that was partly because of what he’d been told all his life, but to the degree that life is about the people in our lives, he was missing so much. And I’m very glad he got to keep his genius.”

Answer: I had the exact same feelings at book’s end.  Even though he seemed happy and fulfilled, I wished he’d never taken the treatment – and immediately felt guilty because I guess I was being selfish, missing the old Lou.

Nolalib writes: “Like Michelle said earlier, I felt selfish for missing Lou-before. “

Answer: Well, you’re not alone.  One thing the book doesn’t cover that I was curious about was how his friends reacted – especially after their friendship drifted.  Tom, Lucinda, and especially Marjory – did they feel selfish for regretting his decision to take the treatment?

Drldeboer writes: “Like Tom, at the end I found it very hard to accept that Lou didn’t value things about himself that I valued. “

Answer: I wonder whether new Lou would have liked old Lou, or appreciated some of the things that made him “him”.

Otros Ojos writes: “ Her jealousy of Marjory, with resulting statements and actions, culminates in her telling Lou that he needs to associate with “your own kind” — although Emmy, like many other people, doesn’t perceive the difference between her disorder and Lou’s. In this way, the author not only nudges readers about the tendency to lump together all disorders that are superficially similar; she also brings in another concept related to communities of people outside the majority…”

Answer: I also found this very interesting, how Moon contrasts the autistic community and the community of “normals”.  On closer scrutiny, however, it’s surprising how many unsavory similarities exist between the two groups. 

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unegawaya
unegawaya

Congrats to the caption contest winners! Will there be another caption contest? They’re fun..

Gilder
Gilder

From reading y’all’s discussion, I think I’ll skip THE SPEED OF DARK. My only nephew is autistic.

Brie’s latest photos are so cute…I can almost feel her in my arms! (Time I got back to the shelter as volunteer!)

Congrats to the top three captioners!

The DESTINY is looking pretty darn steampunk…!

Bailey
Bailey

Congrats to the caption winnners – too funny!
And David Hewlett twittered one of his followers:
“cast has heard nothing about Atlantis movie. I think the chances of it happening now are slim to none…such a waste!”
and he seems like an upbeat kind of guy, so now I really am saddened. Darn it

ytimynona
ytimynona

@Gilder Yeah, I’ve noticed that SyFy is big on the steampunk… Warehouse 13 has that sort of feel, too!

All the captions are quite awesome, but I like the Ba’al reference best. =)

unegawaya
unegawaya

@Gilder – You volunteer at a shelter? Me too! The dogs are wonderful…

luvnjack
luvnjack

Scratching your heads?? And you accuse us of drinking…. wink

pg15

You can’t fool us with your vague and mysterious teases, Joe, as they are all transparent to logic. Observe:

Qu’est-ce que c’est? = What is this?

So essentially, the caption is “What is this? Indeed.” Now, this is obviously a loaded statement; your “indeed” no doubt refers to the fact that we already have the answer, but we don’t realize it.

Thus, that thing is a “This”. What a great looking This. The Art Department have made many Thises, but this is clearly the best looking This so far.

Also, the thing in the 3rd pic looks like a telescope.

Congratulations to the caption contest winners! JES, I suggest you ask for Flocking. Not only does it bring you a world of joy, but it also gives you the ability to travel forward in time at a rate of 1 second/s; allows light to impact the optical nerve at the back of your eye without the need for advanced technology like a personal force shield device; makes it possible to get up to 4 quarters when you want change for a dollar; and, of course, the best of all: it looks like fake snow, which is so much warmer, and thus better, than real snow.

Ponytail
Ponytail

Congratulations to JES and the runner ups. Will you let us know later what JES won? If it is super cool, I may have to hire a writing team for the next caption contest. It was fun.

Interesting discussion on The Speed of Dark. I did not feel selfish for feeling the loss of the old Lou. Because there was nothing wrong with the old Lou in the first place. He was just more unique than other people. When he read that big text book and understood it, I think that could have been the beginning of a new phase in his life. He learned so easily, who knows where that would have taken him. He did not have to alter his brain. His mind was brilliant already. He just needed to develop it more.

Seems like today the increase in autistic diagnosis is frightenly soaring. I never heard of it when I was young. And only occasionally as I got older. Reading Lou’s thoughts and the way he saw the world does make me think that I may be slightly autistic. So slight, it shows up only in my personality. I thought that before I even read this book. Maybe, like Lou, it is because those “normal” people are busy making anyone who is not quite like them, feel bad about themselves.

I wonder about myself because I too like to be alone. I shy alway from people. One on one I’m okay. Maybe even exceptional. But add another person to the mix and I back up. My desk at work is organized in a particular way. Paper clips all lined up. Rubber bands stacked neatly together to resemble a birds nest. And I have had the same silk flower arrangement on my desk for 15 years! My co-workers complained they were sick of it after the first 3 years. Twelve years later it is still there. I love it and look at it everyday. It never gets old. I listen for speech patterns in people so I can tell when they are happy, angry or worried. I watch faces for these signs also. I think I liked Lou so much because I can relate to him. He was a great guy and I thought he had made an excellent life for himself. If we would just stop listening to those normals around us, life would be more satisfying.

ytimynona
ytimynona

Does the crew always wear awesome shirts to work, or only when their pictures are taken?

Ponytail
Ponytail

I’ll tell you one more story on why I might be slightly autistic. I am an organizer. I arrange like sets of objects into stacks, rows, piles, whatever is appropriate for the objects. It drives them crazy at work. They will open my desk drawer and say, “Oh my god, look at how neat everything is!”. When I eat a little bag of M&M’s, I arrange them in rows according to color. Then I eat the longest row down until all rows are equal. No doubt someone will always walk by and see my M&M’s all lined up and say, “Oh my god, look what she is doing now!!” I give them my best Ronon impersonation and say, “what?”. They are like, “everyone, come see this!”. I just smile and say it dumped out of the bag that way. Freaks them out every time! But always good for a laugh.

Narelle from Aus

Congrats to all the winners!

Narelle from Aus

Don’t suppose you’d ever run a contest for being consistently annoying? I’d have that one in the bag. Or at least be in the Top 3.

paloosa
paloosa

Congrats to all the winners! They all made me laugh. Good stuff!

Arctic Goddess

@ Gilder: My son is autistic as well. Although there are lots of challenges having a disabled child, I find it interesting to learn about how other people view the disability and if others can see some parts of it as a gift. I know that it’s been a major challenge having a child with this disorder, but, in many ways, he’s taught me a lot. So, I look forward to reading the book from that perspective. I can’t participate in the book club since I don’t have time to read the books suggested. But there are certain books that are so compelling, that I will save them for when I do have time to read them.

Joe: We all have nick names for this blog. If you had to have a nick name for someone else’s blog or if you were lurking on the Gateworld forums, which one would you pick?

Patricia

otros ojos
otros ojos

Great pics. SGU’s sets really do have that steampunk look in places. – Qu’est-ce que c’est? Dunno, but I think it’s watching your blog readers. On The Speed of Dark: On closer scrutiny, however, it’s surprising how many unsavory similarities exist between the two groups. Yes, that’s how I feel about the book’s characters and their counterparts in real life. I really wish that everyone could be like Lou and most of his fencing group: different, but tolerant, accepting, and not wanting to quit working through issues, thereby growing as people. Everyone’s brought up such good points about this book (especially re. its ending, about which I’m ambivalent; Dr. Fornum alone would be enough to make me want to be normal), and there’s still a fair amount that hasn’t been covered — things that aren’t necessarily major plot elements, I mean, but are still interesting and important in some way, such as music being such a major part of Lou’s life. I think the abundance of as-yet-undiscussed material is pretty incredible, but then it’s really an incredible book. The truth is this is a debate we should be having now at a time when drugs that alter brain chemistry are being prescribed to deal with everything from depression to attention deficit disorder. I’m sure that they help in many cases, but what are some of the undiscussed drawbacks? That’s a major button-pushing, soap-box rant topic for me. I don’t intend any offense toward anyone who has a psychiatric diagnosis — I have one myself — but at the psych facility where I work, it’s not that uncommon to have people come in because of psych meds they’ve been given – inappropriate or unnecessary meds, excessive dose, whatever. Or, one med or another has created emotional and/or physical dependence, and someone who’s tired of the side effects decides to stop cold, and possibly winds up in ER or ICU before going to the psych floor. OD’s, intended or not, and all too easy with some psych meds. Or someone doesn’t pay attention to instructions about drug interactions, especially when there’s more than one doc prescribing, and communication is woefully lacking. I learned to tend bullet holes as a result of two patients taking an ill-advised medication combo. Psychiatry was the neglected stepchild of medicine for a long time (and often still is, but anyway). However, now that breakthroughs in knowledge and treatment have taken place in some areas, there’s quite a bit of bandwagon-hopping. Misdiagnoses are made; prescriptions are written when a course of behavioral therapy might actually be more effective as well as making meds unnecessary, but maybe both doc and patient really want change NOW. Or maybe a typically short-sighted health insurance group will pay for the meds, but no other type of therapy — which really makes me burn, especially where kids and adolescents are involved. I’m fortunate in that I rarely need meds, while I acknowledge that they’re an immeasurably great blessing for many people with disorders… Read more »

silver_comet
silver_comet

@iamza

It struck me as kind of ironic that the first thing Lou does after his treatment is sign up to be an astronaut, and travel to the stars, far away from all the normal people just like him. Is that what normal means? Wanting so much to be like everyone else right up until we are, and then we want to be something different and escape?

Wow, that’s really an interesting thought. Didn’t see that myself.

Joe wrote:

Answer: I think she was written this way to place us fully in Lou’s perspective. Like him, we don’t know for certain whether she does or doesn’t like him in “that way”. Rather than be allowed into her mind and know for sure, we share in Lou’s anxiety and doubt.

That’s a good explanation. Now, that makes a lot of sense. Nevertheless, I’m still curious about her feelings. wink

Joe wrote:

I mean, having dealt with my share of jerks, I totally sympathized with them. It’s hard to turn the other cheek or be understanding with an openly hostile individual. I guess I’m guilty of it myself.

Don’t be too hard on yourself. Sometimes (more often than not?) a jerk is just that: a jerk. wink And, although I believe that other people can have somehow a bearing on our personality, it would be again the easiest way. To claim becoming a jerk just because other people didn’t care enough. As if someone wouldn’t have a choice. In the end, everybody is responsible for himself and his actions.

I want to thank you, not only for this book, which leads to interesting discussions (I loved reading everyone’s thoughts about it), but also for the BOTM club in general. It definitely broadens my mind. Most of the suggested books I wouldn’t have chosen by myself. And I believe many of them aren’t well-known in Germany (yet).

Also congratulations for your short story and to the winners of the Caption This Contest. I’m sure, it wasn’t an easy decision. wink

Shawna
Shawna

So… what happens if SGU doesn’t get picked up for a second season? This is why I hate cliffhanger finales. Sure, it’s all well and good to hope it gets picked up, but if it doesn’t, the fans are screwed. And if it does get renewed, I still don’t like it. After three or more months of lag, the “I must know now!” feeling has worn off, so you’re either going to watch the new season or not based on whether you liked the first season as a whole, not just because you want to know the ending of a story you’ve had a good chance of forgetting by that point.

webgurl

More on Speed of Dark: JM: What I found particularly interesting was the fact that, despite his skills in pattern recognition, Lou was unable to figure out who was behind the acts of vandalism directed against him. Rather, he works it all out in his head and yet refuses to accept the logical conclusion because allows his emotions and sense of right and wrong to overrule the obvious answer. I found it perfectly reasonable. Don equals Friend. Friend does not equal People who slash tires etc…therefore Don does not equal People who slash tires etc. I found it simple and totally logical. Ponytail writes: “His only issues where sometimes having trouble communicating and handling emotions. Don’t we all?” JM: No argument here. I reader some reader reviews after I finished the book and was surprised by how many people strongly related with Lou – to the point that some of them wondered whether they were “slightly autistic”. I think that’s putting it very simply. Lou had more issues than that – taking things literally and understanding non-verbal cues (he had to learn to get around these things and it sounded like his parents did a great job). While it is common for people to have one characteristic (perhaps they don’t have great eye contact for example) they would have to have a certain number to be considered autistic. That’s true isn’t it MikeB? JM: Yes, which is why I, personally, found the ending more tragic than hopeful. JM: I wonder whether new Lou would have liked old Lou, or appreciated some of the things that made him “him”. I actually found it hopeful. I felt that the existence of Lou-Before deep inside the new Lou was a big F You to the people handing out the treatment. I’m sure they thought that nothing would remain of the old Lou. Perhaps I’m reading something into the end that no-one else is reading. I am sitting here at a desk entering my notes, and the desk is in a ship and the ship is in space, and the space is full of light. Lou-before hugs the series to him, dancing inside me like a joyous child, I feign more sobriety, in my workday coverall, though I can feel a smile tugging at the corner of my mouth. We both hear the same music Isn’t that hopeful? Silver_comet also writes: “From Don’s point of view it’s so much easier to blame Lou for everything instead of himself. He was definitely a person who couldn’t take responsibility for his own actions. The question for me is, has anybody ever explained that to Don? Really, in a friendly way? Or did they just turn away and confirmed therefore his way of thinking?” JM: Hey, that’s a very interesting point. Did the others contribute to Don’s descent by not showing him the kidness and respect they showed Lou. Was there a double standard here? I mean, having dealt with my share of jerks, I totally sympathized… Read more »

Anais33

Coucou Joseph!

Vous allez bien? Ohh snif vous ne m’avez même pas souhaitez mon anniversaire =(…cela ne m’aurai tellement fait plaisir, mais bon j’aurai du m’en douter, j’ai l’habitude.

J’espere que vous allez passer une trés bonne journée! Merci encore pour ces photos.

bisou, à bientôt.

chevron7
chevron7

Sorry for confusing you all. My computer seemed to save my alternate identity and I only just realised. LOL! It really is Chev.

Cheers, Chev

chevron7
chevron7

Congrats to JES, K-Man and DougIndy. What a tough choice it must have been.

Cheers, Chev

chevron7
chevron7

Ponytail said:

I’ll tell you one more story on why I might be slightly autistic. I am an organizer. I arrange like sets of objects into stacks, rows, piles, whatever is appropriate for the objects.

My nephew used to line up all of his toy cars when he was little and you really didn’t want to mess them up.

If you’re curious, try the Autism Quotient test which measures the extent of Autistic traits in adults. It’s not an official diagnosis but it may help you decide whether to talk to a doctor about taking the real test, if you really want to know that is.

Cheers, Chev

JES
JES

Thank you; thank you so much (I love Brenda Leigh Johnson) for picking our (husband provided it; I entered it) caption. Knowing Joe’s previous generosity (flocking?), I’m sure the prize will ease our concerns about the recession and its impact on our retirement savings. Barring that, I’m sure it will be a wonderful keepsake as we move into our golden years. Oh, wait; we’re already in our golden years. In that case, hurry up with the prize, Joe. wink Thanks again.

chevron7
chevron7

Questions for Elizabeth Moon:

1. What research did you do to get Lou’s internal monologue so authentic, or what I imagine it to be? Was it a difficult style to write and and did you find it flowed as you went along?

2. I loved Lou’s POV and found it abrupt when you switched to Pete or Tom’s POV. Did you ever consider writing it solely from Lou’s POV?

3. Everyone seems to see the ending as tragic, whereas I see it as hopeful. What did you think as you were writing it?

4. How did the Nebula Award change your life professionally?

5. What are you reading at the moment?

Cheers, Chev

Airelle
Airelle

Congrats to the winners,the contest was fun and garnered a lot of comments for the blog, so double good, waitin’ anxiously for the next one.
That last picture, he looks like he is working on antique roadshow,and how much is this item(found in my attic) worth?!?
And the first picture, is that the exhaust pipe for the BBQ smoker?!?
-the middle pix,,hmmm,