In a previous blog entry, I ranted about the shit book recommendations put forth by numerous reputable websites.  It would seem that, in many cases, the quality of the work is of much less importance than the connections of the author.  Well, someone recently directed me to BBC.com’s “books” section which offers up a monthly list of suggested titles.  They’re a varied lot and some may not be to your taste, but take a chance (like I did) and you’ll be pleasantly surprised (like I was).

Or, you can check out any of the following books – “My Favorite 5 Recent Reads”:

The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley by Hannah Tinti (General Fiction)

After years spent living on the run, Samuel Hawley moves with his teenage daughter, Loo, to Olympus, Massachusetts. There, in his late wife’s hometown, Hawley finds work as a fisherman, while Loo struggles to fit in at school and grows curious about her mother’s mysterious death. Haunting them both are twelve scars Hawley carries on his body, from twelve bullets in his criminal past; a past that eventually spills over into his daughter’s present, until together they must face a reckoning yet to come. This father-daughter epic weaves back and forth through time and across America, from Alaska to the Adirondacks.

Ill Will by Dan Chaon (Thriller)

“We are always telling a story to ourselves, about ourselves.” This is one of the little mantras Dustin Tillman likes to share with his patients, and it’s meant to be reassuring. But what if that story is a lie?

A psychologist in suburban Cleveland, Dustin is drifting through his forties when he hears the news: His adopted brother, Rusty, is being released from prison. Thirty years ago, Rusty received a life sentence for the massacre of Dustin’s parents, aunt, and uncle. The trial came to epitomize the 1980s hysteria over Satanic cults; despite the lack of physical evidence, the jury believed the outlandish accusations Dustin and his cousin made against Rusty. Now, after DNA analysis has overturned the conviction, Dustin braces for a reckoning.

Meanwhile, one of Dustin’s patients has been plying him with stories of the drowning deaths of a string of drunk college boys. At first Dustin dismisses his patient’s suggestions that a serial killer is at work as paranoid thinking, but as the two embark on an amateur investigation, Dustin starts to believe that there’s more to the deaths than coincidence. Soon he becomes obsessed, crossing all professional boundaries—and putting his own family in harm’s way.

The Suicide Motor Club by Christopher Buehlman (Horror)

Remember that car that passed you near midnight on Route 66, doing 105 with its lights off? You wondered where it was going so quickly on that dark, dusty stretch of road, motor roaring, the driver glancing out the window as he blew by.

Did his greedy eyes shine silver like a coyote’s? Did he make you feel like prey?

You can’t remember now.

You just saw the founder of the Suicide Motor Club. Be grateful his brake lights never flashed. Be grateful his car was already full.

They roam America, littering the highways with smashed cars and bled-out bodies, a gruesome reflection of the unsettled sixties. But to anyone unlucky enough to meet them in the lonely hours of the night, they’re just a blurry memory.

That is—to all but one…

Two years ago, they left a witness in the mangled wreck of her family car, her husband dead, her son taken. She remembers their awful faces, despite their tricks and glamours. And she’s coming for them—her thirst for vengeance even more powerful than their hunger for blood.

On the deserted highways of America, the hunters are about to become the hunted…

The Collapsing Empire by John Scalzi (Science Fiction)

Our universe is ruled by physics and faster than light travel is not possible — until the discovery of The Flow, an extra-dimensional field we can access at certain points in space-time that transport us to other worlds, around other stars.

Humanity flows away from Earth, into space, and in time forgets our home world and creates a new empire, the Interdependency, whose ethos requires that no one human outpost can survive without the others. It’s a hedge against interstellar war — and a system of control for the rulers of the empire.

The Flow is eternal — but it is not static. Just as a river changes course, The Flow changes as well, cutting off worlds from the rest of humanity. When it’s discovered that The Flow is moving, possibly cutting off all human worlds from faster than light travel forever, three individuals — a scientist, a starship captain and the Empress of the Interdependency — are in a race against time to discover what, if anything, can be salvaged from an interstellar empire on the brink of collapse.

The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen (Historical Fiction)

The winner of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, as well as five other awards, The Sympathizer is the breakthrough novel of the year. With the pace and suspense of a thriller and prose that has been compared to Graham Greene and Saul Bellow, The Sympathizer is a sweeping epic of love and betrayal. The narrator, a communist double agent, is a “man of two minds,” a half-French, half-Vietnamese army captain who arranges to come to America after the Fall of Saigon, and while building a new life with other Vietnamese refugees in Los Angeles is secretly reporting back to his communist superiors in Vietnam. The Sympathizer is a blistering exploration of identity and America, a gripping espionage novel, and a powerful story of love and friendship.

If you do get a chance to read any of the aforementioned, give me your take in the comments section.

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KathyC

A couple of those sound intriguing…I’ll put them on my list for when I can read for pleasure again…April 19th is almost here!

JeffW
JeffW

The Suicide Motor Club? Talk about being a target audience! Let’s see: Cars, Route 66, dark lonely highways, and of course, mystery, murder, and revenge. I feel like that book was aiming right at my demographic.

Time to go look it up on Kindle…

Tammy Dixon
Tammy Dixon

Oh my, I do look forward to your book reviews. Thanks and I will study your descriptions and see if anything tingles!

Margaret Clayton

I agree, Suicide Motor Club sounds intriguing. Yes, I still am having trouble reading. One book two thirds of the way in three years. Sad.

MaggieL80
MaggieL80

I’m writing these down and am already planning to suggest a few of these for book club. Also adding to my summer reading list.

We are currently reading The Widow for book club. The general consensus is “it’s different” which doesn’t bode well typically.

lulu

I am always interested in book recommendations and wonder how it will be possible to read all that is on my list.

PBMom

The Collapsing Empire looks good….if I had time.