“That’s a wrap!” A collective sigh of relief rose up from everyone on the floor. It was 11:30 p.m. and the cast and crew were no doubt looking forward to a well-deserved break. Everyone has worked extremely hard on what has proven a very challenging episode so far, and their creativity, commitment, and consistently upbeat attitude have been greatly appreciated.

Day 4 saw us hopscotching from the alleyway-night to the well back to the alleyway-day, then over to the heart of the village before ending up in Tent #3 for our final shots. While we were shooting, Christina Cox received word that she had received a Constellation nomination for Best Female Performance in a 2007 Science Fiction Television Episode for her work on the Blood Ties episode 5:55. Congratulations to Christina who will be up against our own Amanda Tapping (nominated for SG-1’s The Road Not Taken). Christina, by the way, not only knows how to handle a gun, but is incredibly savvy with regard to military protocol, a stickler for proper procedure in all of her scenes. And for those who doubted her ability to pull off a tough, military character based on the fact that she is “too pretty” – well, after watching her portrayal these last few days, I can say, with the utmost confidence, that she could easily kick all of your asses. Janina, meanwhile, has put her skeet shooting experience (I kid you not) to good use, and Nicole gets to show off her newfound skills next week. Finally, for those of you who commented – yeah, Paul’s hair is mighty dark. The hair department had to color his hair to match last year’s look and, uh, made him a tad too youthful-looking. Poor Paul washed his hair about a dozen times in an effort to restore a more natural look. And I’m pleased to report that he somewhat succeeded.

As most of you know, Jeffrey Ford, the author of April’s fantasy BOTM club selection, dropped by earlier in the week to say hello, introduce himself, and offer us a sneak peek at/solicit our opinions on an unfinished short story. Well, today, Jeff returns to respond to all of your questions and comments on both The Empire of Ice Cream and Recipe For a Journey to Quibo.

Before I turn this entry over to Jeff, I’d just like to take a moment to thank him for guesting with us and really showing great generosity, not only with his time but with his work as well. Jeff, I’m sure I speak for all of us when I say you have an open invitation to drop by any time whether it be to discuss your work, update us on any developments on the Ford Front, or complain about our decision to kill off the Carson Beckett character in season 3. By the way, anyone interested should head on over to http://14theditch.livejournal.com/ and check out the April 25th entry on an imaginary city named Urville and how it came to be.

Anyway, I’m off to prep my Chocolate Party. Pics to follow tomorrow. In the meantime, enjoy the Q&A, then check out the behind-the-scenes vid from the Whispers set at the bottom of the page.

“Dear Book Club Members: This has been a really wonderful experience for me. I can’t thank you enough for taking the time to read my book and the story fragment and make insightful, imaginative comments on both. I fully appreciate both the criticisms and the mention of those things that worked for you. You can’t believe how helpful that is to a writer. As for the “Journey to Quibo” suggestions and analysis, all I can say is you guys are a creative lot. There are so many good suggestions that I’m going to have to go back and study them closely for a while before I begin again on the story. You’ve given me much inspiration for it, though, and sparked my interest in finishing it. So if you ever see it published somewhere, please take some credit, just don’t sue me. In all seriousness, though, thanks for the help. Many of you singled out “The Green Word” as the stiffest story in the collection, and I have to tell you that I agree with you. It’s not bad, but it’s so been done before and better. It kind of lays there like a whale turd on the bottom of the ocean. I was pleased that many of you enjoyed “Botch Town.” You might want to pick up The Shadow Year if you get a chance as it is really very much re-imagined and extended and better written. If you do I hope you like it as much or more. It was delightful to find that so many of you liked “Jupiter’s Skull” which I like myself, even though it didn’t get much play when it came out. I want to alert you to the fact that I have another short story collection coming in November, The Drowned Life, from Harper Collins. Last but not least, I have to thank Joe, who was a very gracious host and ran everything so flawlessly. I very much appreciate having been invited to the fun here. My only question was when does Joe Mallozzi ever sleep? I asked him this on the e-mail and he told me he thinks of it longingly from time to time, and some day he’ll get back to it. Hope you can catch a nap soon, Joe. Happy reading to all!

Eva K writes: “The Short story posted would be easier to comment on if I had already read the book, but since not, I was wondering how it came to be in the first place?
Was it an idea which came as a means to an end, and you’re just not there yet?
Or was it a beginning that caught your fancy and you’re not sure what you’re working towards? Or was it an idea that came to you, and you’re trying to form everything else around it? It seems like it’d be easier to know how to get somewhere when you know where you’re trying to get to. You don’t need a map, just a compass.”

EvaK: To tell you the truth, I really don’t remember what it was that gave me the idea to start with. I have always been enamored of libraries and the idea of libraries. Wait, I just deleted a line, because as I was writing a response to you, it came to me where this idea for this story came from. I’d forgotten about this. I had a dream in which I was visiting a city called Lindrethool and it was somewhere up north, near the arctic circle. It had a zoo with a strange creature in it. I started this story after having that dream and then I got stuck because I thought it was too similar to the Borges story, “The Library of Babel.” It wasn’t that the story was similar, but I thought the tone of the writing was. Now I can see that isn’t the case. I actually used the name of the city, Lindrethool, in another story that appeared in the on-line magazine, Sci Fiction, “Floating In Lindrethool.” That was an interesting revelation as, like I said, I’d forgotten it entirely. Thanks for asking.

Beverly writes: “Since you write in both mystery and science fiction genres, and have won awards for both, do you prefer to write one over the other, or do you prefer to blend them as you did in “Botch Town” and “The Shadow Year”?”

Beverly: I don’t consciously plan to blend them. What happens instead is that the story comes to me and I just write it down. I’m not trying to mix genres, I just do. Writing for me, both stories and novels, is an act of discovery and not of construction. The whole thing is far more organic. I rarely consider genre at all before writing, but I do consider the voice the story will be told in and I try to see the character. Then I just follow the character and he/she takes me to the story. I know, wacky.

Thornyrose writes: “Which do you prefer to write, short stories or novels? Do you have any particular conditions to write in, such as quiet/sunny room, particular music, or do you write as the Muse strikes?”

Thornyrose: I like to write both short stories and novels, but for different reasons. The stories allow me to stretch as a writer, because it doesn’t take as long to write them. They allow messing around with different styles and structures and voices, and I would be bored and would probably not get any better as a writer if I were to stop writing them altogether. As for novels, they can contain larger ideas and have more undercurrents, and take more stamina. They are both journeys in a way, but one is briefer and more intense and the other is a long trek to a far country. Both forms of travel suit me. I have an office I write in at home. It looks like a tornado hit it. I go in there and burn some incense and put on music – Harold Budd or Phillip Glass or something equally innocuous – and that’s where the magic, so to speak, happens, or sometimes doesn’t. I sit at the computer every day. Sometimes the muse is out on errands, but I’m always there if she should show up.

Sylvia writes: “ What is the foundation for the creation of some of the titles? The choices are quite enticing as fantasy and not typical non-fiction. When seeing “Eeling-ok,” my brain started to make that “Feeling OK. Similar with the Twilmish, which I started to see Twilight Mist. Of course with this thought, the selection “Weight of Words” had added meaning thrown into the mix you provided. It seemed that all of the stories I digested had elements of darkness; was this deliberate for the book? Or, is that part of your style/format?”

Sylvia: Titles are a funny thing. I’m not really conscious all the time as to how they come about. I like the ideas that you say my titles suggested to you. You are obviously tuned in to words being catalysts for the imagination. When I come up with a title, I want something that is not going to give the plot away. That’s definite. I usually pick something that is a little bit of a mis-direction but makes an interesting phrase in and of itself. I’ve read so many books of stories in my life, and one of the first things I do is scan the table of contents and see which title I want to read first. Something with a little mystery, a little promise of something wonderful, but nothing too outlandish. Then again, some of the best stories hide behind brief or deceptively bland titles. As for the “darkness” in the stories, I don’t measure it out like an ingredient in a recipe, but because I’m telling stories about people, the stories will all have a measure of darkness in them, some more than others, some less, just like all of our lives. I hope that you found a good measure of humor in the book as well.

Tiger’s Eye writes: “But, out of this outstanding collection, my favorite was “Jupiter’s Skull.” Did you have a particular place in mind when describing the Bolukuchet? It seems like it could be an amalgam of a hundred different run-down waterfront hangouts with their lolling, lingering artist-types in varying degrees of debauchery.”

Tiger’s Eye: I pictured a kind of setting like, but not exactly, the French Quarter in New Orleans. I’d been there before Katrina and found it a really exciting place – great people, great food and I’m a jazz lover. But if you took the Quarter and took all of the excitement out of it, and made it lazy and a little more run down, with less people, maybe that is a good part of the Bolukuchet.

Tiger’s Eyes also writes: “In writing “Botch Town,” which I loved for how adroitly you brought an entire community to life in its pages, was it difficult for you to deal with subject matter that was painful for you as a child? Or has it been helpful to get some things out in the open? Also, if you have the time and inclination, could you talk a little more about how you progressed from penning character sketches as a boy to writing full-fledged stories? Or a bit about how your tastes in reading evolved over time?

(If this is all covered in your LiveJournal, I’ll be happy to read it there.)

Also, what do you like best to focus on as a teacher?”

Tiger’s Eye: You ask the big questions. That’s cool. Yes, there was a point where I had to stop writing The Shadow Year, the novel, and put it aside because I’d gotten to a place in it where I was having trouble dealing with the memories. I was, at that time, putting together a collection, so I used the first part of the novel and made it into a novella. The whole thing was conceived of and begun with the idea of it being the novel. In order to fulfill the contract I had for the novel, I wrote a book called The Girl in the Glass, which went on to win the Edgar Allan Poe Award. But then the collection, which is Empire came out, and people really liked the novella of “Botch Town” and so with that encouragement, and at the suggestion of a friend and my wife and my editor at Harper Collins, I went back to The Shadow Year and finally finished it. What I needed to do was remember that I was writing a novel and not a memoir and that made the project do-able. Before I had that revelation, I was becoming hypnotized by the actual events of the past and this made me unable to write. Even though the book did come out a novel and not a memoir, I did manage to get a few things out in the open that I needed to. I’m not sure what they were, but I can feel that their burden is gone from me. I wrote my first stories in real life when I was 9 years old. My father used to read to us, adult novels, when we were kids. He read King Solomon’s Mines, Doctor Jekyll and Mister Hyde, Treasure Island, etc. Hearing those stories read was such an intense experience for me. I could so vividly see the characters and the action in my head. I wanted to be able to create that magic. And from that point on, I worked at it. And it took me a long long time to get good. I had certain issues of dyslexia and so forth which hobbled me somewhat, but it all kind of worked out because I just stuck with it through thick and thin. All I’ll say about my reading tastes is they are very eclectic. I love a story well told, well written, with good characters and interesting dilemmas and I don’t care what genre it’s in, or who wrote it or what part of the world it’s from. The major thing I focus on when teaching fiction writing is I try to get the students to understand that fiction is primarily drama – characters, dialogue, bodies in motion through time, and it’s not about lecturing the reader or trying to create the most impressive intellectual symbolism. New writers think that the symbols and leitmotifs their teachers picked out of stories in class were put their by the writer consciously, injected like the guy was filling cream doughnuts on the graveyard shift. The secret is to relinquish control to the story, and let your subconscious work. When you do that, all those things that they think are artificially injected, come forth with the story, intact.

Iamza writes: “(1) Having written Botch Town, what made you go back and expand the novella into The Shadow Year? Does the novel continue on after the end of the events of Botch Town, adding more to the story, or is it an expansion of the story outlined in the novella?

(2) You mention in one of the post-story mini-discussions that you’d written a story in three days, and that it was one of the faster short stories you’d ever written. How long do your stories normally take to come out on the page? Do you have a group of people with whom you discuss your stories as they progress? Or first readers/reviewers who read the stories once the (n-th) draft is complete, who give you feedback on the story? Or do you just know when your story is done?

(3) Of all the stories in The Empire of Ice Cream, which do you personally think is best? Why?

(4) I noticed that a couple of the stories in this collection feature writers named Jeff as the main protagonist. Marion Bradley once used a metaphor describing the art of writing as being akin to having a draft lift up one’s skirt, exposing things that perhaps the writer might not necessarily have intended to share with the world. Have you ever felt overly exposed by any of your stories?”

Iamza: OK, number 1 of your questions, I think I answered pretty well above. 2) The stories usually take me about two weeks to write. The initial writing of it is about a week, and then I mess around with it and edit it and tinker with it for about a week. I don’t discuss my stories much with other people. The writer, a very good writer of fantastic fiction, Richard Bowes, sometimes reads them and gives me advice on them when I’m stuck, but usually I don’t consult with anyone. On the novels, I have 3 friends who read them in their early drafts – Mike Gallagher, Rick Bowes and Bill Watkins. They just read and let me know if what I’m doing seems on track or is completely ridiculous. Sometimes my wife, Lynn, gets in on the act. She’s a good reader. I never feel like they’re really done, but eventually you have to send them out. Luckily, I work usually with truly fantastic editors, Jennifer Brehl at Harper Collins has been my book editor for my last 5 novels, and Ellen Datlow edits a lot of my short stories. Having a great editor is irreplaceable. By the way, the story I wrote in 3 days was “The Trentino Kid,” which is in Empire and that was for Ellen Datlow’s ghost story anthology, The Dark, from TOR books.

Trekkiegirlt writes: “Is Higbee (did I spell that right?) Street a real street and did you grow up there?”

Trekkiegirl: I’m taking the 5th on that question. But if I did grow up there, that would be the way it would be spelled. And if it was real it might lead into a road called Udall.

http://s230.photobucket.com/albums/ee164/BaronDestructo/?action=view&current=Dustyswalkthroughtheabandonedmarket.flv

40 thoughts on “April 26th, 2008: Whispers Day 4 and The Return of Author Jeffrey Ford

  1. EnJoy the weekend …….
    Hardwork always pays off
    I thank you for your efforts and the efforts of the cast and crew to help to make my Friday nights worth looking forward to. July can’t get here soon enough.
    I do hope your eyes is better.

    Take Care
    Jean :~)

  2. Joe,
    Hope the party went swimmingly! I just told my fellow teachers at lunch the other day that chocolate is it’s own food group!

    As much as I love Paul/Carson, glad they are trying to do something about the hair that was just a little too dark (but I bet it brought his eyes out even more, humph maybe you all should leave it alone)… Speaking of Paul/Carson have the odds of him being back for more than 5 episodes increased yet as the back half of the season continues to be discussed? Or will that depend on the fan reaction to having Carson back? I know that a number of us would like to see him back full time.

  3. hey there joe
    have you ever come to al porto ristorante on water street to eat? I hostess there and i have to say i really love the food there, italian if course. It would be great to see you down there. Oh also expect some chocolate soonish from me, i got my galaxy chocolate through from england at last!
    bex
    PS am still loving my classes at VFS, i get Bill Marchant teaching me next term and cant wait

  4. And for those who doubted her ability to pull off a tough, military character based on the fact that she is “too pretty”

    I don’t think anyone did that. Some posters expressed the opinion that they found it statistically unlikely that such a group of women would chose to join the army – a reflection on looks not ability.

  5. Tell Christina and Amanda Congrats for me on the nominations. I love Blood Ties and am hoping for a season 2 pickup. Just about anything to do with vampires and I’m there. I cannot wait to see Whispers, but I guess I’ll have to wait. Thanks for the daily updates. I enjoyed them. Please feel free to enjoy as much chocolate for me since (a) I’m lactose intollerant and can’t eat milk chocolate and (b) I’m on a diet so I shouldn’t eat ANY chocolate, but I’m weak and I do anyway.

  6. Hi Joe,

    Congrats on the wrap, and enjoy the chocolate party! I take it they eye cleared up and you’re not going as a pirate?

    The vid clip is spooky-awesome the fog looks great! And after having seen it and the photos from the past few days, I wanted to ask you how much work is going to be needed to clean up after the fog tents and all the added spookiness? (is that even a word)?

    Congrats to Amanda and Christina – I’ve watched the full episode run of Blood Ties and enjoyed it very much – 5:55 was a great eps.

    Nika

  7. Thans to Mr. Ford for taking the time to answer our questions. It’s always fascinating to see the process of creation, so to speak. Mr. M, I hope you have a fantastic party, followed by many hours of blissful sleep. The local chocolate festival was all-in-all a dud. Just reading the list of where your chocolates are coming from was more satisfying, with a few minor exceptions. Looking forward to the pictures and the reporting tomorrow.

  8. Latest check on the Stargate participants in the charitybuzz.com “win a lunch with … ” auction:

    Amanda is up to $7,100.
    Jewell at $3,500.
    RDA is holding at $15,000
    Joe F. is up to $21,500!

    Still time to bid gang – the auction isn’t over until the 29th.

  9. And for those who doubted her ability to pull off a tough, military character based on the fact that she is “too pretty” – well, after watching her portrayal these last few days, I can say, with the utmost confidence, that she could easily kick all of your asses.

    Oh. I thought you were going to say something like “I can say, with the utmost confidence, that she is as homely as the rest of us.”

    But, seriously, I am looking forward to seeing an all-female team do their thing. I am an EMT and frequently have all women on my crew. We are a gorgeous bunch who can do the job as well as the guys, sometimes better.

  10. Hey Tammy… quit telling everyone about the bidding… I don’t want to get out bid! Giggles!

  11. This is a big THANK YOU to Jeffery Ford. I appreciate your hobnobbing with us readers and letting us participate in your artistic process! I will read The Shadow Year as soon as possible.
    Tracy

  12. Jeffrey Ford – Thanks so much for your time in answering questions. I enjoyed, and learned a lot from, your responses to other people’s questions as well as my own. I’ve really liked finding out more about where you’re coming from as a writer, since (at least in Empire) biographical elements show up fairly often, or so it seemed to me. – I had to laugh at your remark about early writers and symbolism. I found that tendency frustrating, and I was only a student; I didn’t have to moderate the class discussions or read the papers. Thanks on behalf of all of us who’ve ever tried an English prof’s patience. – Regarding the obstacles you’ve faced as a writer, I’m very glad you had the drive to stick it out, since I love your stories; they’ve been a source of great pleasure for me. – Thanks for the heads-up about the upcoming release of your new story collection. The book will give me a triad of your short-story collections, since I’ve ordered The Fantasy Writer’s Assistant, and am greatly looking forward to reading it. Best of luck with all your future projects.

    Joe, a really big “thank you” again for setting all this up – the BOTM club and everything that goes with it: blog-reader analyses, author Q&A’s, and anything else that pops up along the way. I’ve really enjoyed it, and can’t emphasize enough how much I’ve appreciated learning about some authors and books that were new to me. They’ve enriched my leisure time, and often, life in general.

    I had fun reading your anecdote about Lulu waking you up earlier than you wanted, although I’m sure it wasn’t too much fun for you.

  13. Joe,

    I can’t wait to see the pics from the chocolate party. I’m sure it will make me drool with envy.

    I’m very happy to have Mr. Ford as our guest, too. I know I’ve said it before but you do spoil us. At least I feel very spoiled.

    I’m way too excited for Season 5. My entire family is already tired of me talking about it already. Which is saying a lot since they are all SGA fans, too.

    Trish

  14. Many Thanks to Mr. Ford for answering/responding to our questions and comments and sharing insight to his work. This is a real treat. You do know how to organize a party, gathering, participation events! Thanks!

    Loved the teaser vid. It will still be a 3 dog night to watch Whispers; but I am looking forward to it. Offering to host a SGA episode party will work; just add food, drink, and chocolate to the the menu.

    In honor of your chocolate party, I had to splurge a little too. The Joe Mallozzi chocolate fest is an International Holiday, is it not? Your event is destined for success; we should immortalize it.

    Hope the eye is better
    Get some rest….you know rest is nature’s medicine.
    Wine and Chocolate are next…

  15. I’m really hoping Christina’s character survives this one. I’d love to see her pop up on Atlantis some more. Honestly, I hate to think about any of the three characters dying. I haven’t even seen the episode, yet, and I already like them all based on your descriptions.

  16. Hey Joe. A question on the video that you posted. How is it that the filming camera manages to get the bluish, clear look to the picture in comparison to your filming, which shows the fog as a grey blob?

  17. Hello —

    I was just directed to your blog about 2 weeks ago and have pretty much spent all my free time reading the entire thing start to finish (yes, I apparently have no life!). Want to say that I’m thoroughly enjoying it and find you a person of infinite humor, wisdom and patience! Plowing through all these comments — wow.

    I’ve watched Stargate: SG1 and Atlantis pretty much from the beginning and am a die-hard fan and wanted to drop out of lurkerdom to say thanks to you and everyone for years of enjoyment.

    I’m also a football fan (a female who follows football, go figure) – did you watch the NFL draft today? Woo woo – 4 of my trojans in the first round!

  18. I can say, with the utmost confidence, that she could easily kick all of your asses

    Or in this Aussie’s case, my arse.

  19. Shadow Step Said:

    Hm… anyone else think Sean Murray looks like a younger version of Mallozzi? *g*

    Actually I think you might be onto something there. If his hair was a little darker.

    I actually found out something about Sean Murray recently. I didn’t know that his mother is married to Donald Bellisario (producer and creator of NCIS). Very interesting. I wonder which came first, his role on the show or the marriage.

    What do you think of bringing family members onto your show Joe? Fantastic idea, problematic or it depends if they’re right for the role? I think Kate Hewlett worked well but I think we had too many DeLuises in SG1.

    Cheers, Chev

  20. Did you do something nasty to Carson’s hair when you froze him? It is flat and lifeless. Or does clone Carson not like hair gel?

    Poor Paul looked like a ghost – but I put it down to bad photography. 🙂

    Susan and d’2kitties.

  21. Hey Joe,

    I just came across this link for National Doodle Day. http://www.doodledayusa.org/why.php It’s a charity organization that raises money for Neurofibromatosis, Inc. by auctioning off celebrity doodles. Mitch Pileggi did one this year. I thought it might be fun if the writing staff and/or any of the actors wanted to participate. I’m sure I’m not the only one who’d bid, and it’s for a good cause.

    I’m not affiliated with the charity. Just thought I’d mention it, in case anyone was interested. Have a great rest of the weekend. Hope Lulu let you sleep in a little bit today.

  22. Mr M thanks again for inviting him & providing the space and Mr Ford, thanks very much for coming by and commenting, answering questions & posting your unfinished story. It was a pleasure.

    Congrats to the actors on nominations… however, my heart is with Amanda to win for one of my fave SG-1 eps!

    Whispers is listed so far as the 7th s5 ep so if the schedule holds, hotly anticipating seeing it in August! Hope your party was choco heaven
    DD

  23. Wow, I had no idea that was Paul, I thought it was Kavan. Yup, the hair is way too dark.

    Love the blog by the way.

  24. Hey Joe, good luck with your chocolate party!

    I was wondering: Is there any possibility that Beckett will come back as a regular cast member?

  25. That’s an awesome video clip. I haven’t been able to get mine to work that well. Special thanks to author Jeffery Ford for stopping by to talk with us. It’s really nice to get feedback straight from the source.

  26. Have the new enemy previously seen anywhere? If not what hint could you tell us apart from simialarities with the Genii

  27. Oh Chev… I hate to argue with your infinite wisdom but I don’t actually think there is such a thing as too many Deluises. 😀

    Ergo is one of my favorites epis! And I am kinda a fan of stalker Pete. 😉

    I kinda miss the Deluises. Dom RULZ!

    At least you and I can agree on Kate.

    Trish

  28. Salut mon super joseph! je suis de retour!! Waou!!! il y’a eu plein de photos et videos durant mon absence, je vais regarder tous sa.

    Kissou a demain ♥

  29. I have sunburn on my neck from my walk yesterday – who knew you need sunscreen in Vancovuer?!

  30. Joe Mallozzi chocolate day already wow time flies.

    Checked my mail and my diary and I’m sure it was just an oversight on your part but….I didn’t appear to have receive my invitation.

    Now no arguments no recriminations I’m sure it was just a faux pas but next year just e-mail me the invite okay!!!

    Seriously hope the party went well and everyone enjoyed themselves, can’t wait for the pics.

    Pauline

  31. Thanks to Jeffrey Ford for the answers and insights!

    I hope your chocolate party goes well Joe, looking forward to a possibly run down of the highlights.

  32. Hope the party went well. I’m sure you won’t be complaining about ‘leftovers!’ Thanks for the explanation regarding Carson/Paul’s hair – he has my sympathies – I’ve had the fun of trying to wash out green dye (this was college and I was expressing myself) overnight for a surprise grad school interview the next day. I did manage to get fairly close to my normal dark blonde, but not without some worries.

  33. Trish (aka whovian) Said:

    Oh Chev… I hate to argue with your infinite wisdom but I don’t actually think there is such a thing as too many Deluises. 😀

    Ergo is one of my favorites epis! And I am kinda a fan of stalker Pete. 😉

    I kinda miss the Deluises. Dom RULZ!

    At least you and I can agree on Kate.

    Trish

    Ooh I loved Urgo too and Dom was excellent. It actually wasn’t him I was talking about (David I didn’t mind too much either, I could see him as a friend of Sam’s brother, although I couldn’t see he and Sam together – I do love the stalker fanfics though :-D). We could have done without Michael. I loved him on The Gilmore Girls but didn’t like him on Stargate. But then again I didn’t like Wormhole Extreme. 200 was so much better.

    Cheers, Chev

  34. “The major thing I focus on when teaching fiction writing is I try to get the students to understand that fiction is primarily drama – characters, dialogue, bodies in motion through time, and it’s not about lecturing the reader or trying to create the most impressive intellectual symbolism.”
    This reminds me of a certain Billy Collins poem titled “Introduction to Poetry,” which I often cite when teachers try to force me to have a distinct underlying meaning when I write. It seems Jeffrey Ford’s philosophy echos my own 🙂

  35. Chev,

    See. I shoulda known better to argue with your infinite wisdom! HA! I am going to swallow my pride (but I’m hungry so it’s OK) and say I agree with you, after all. I like Pete as a friend of Sam’s as well. It’s weird because David Deluise is now on the Disney channel as a wizard or something?! Maybe I was dreaming that show up. Anyway… I also loved Michael on Gilmore Girls, too.

    I’m honestly not sure how I feel about Wormhole Extreme… I haven’t watched it in a while. But I remember enough to see what you mean if you didn’t like him. No real argument there, then.

    Therefore, I hereby I take back my earlier disagreement. 😀

    Trish

    P.S. I also apolgoize for spelling Urgo incorrectly. I only caught it right after I clicked “submit”. Darn those typos! 😛

  36. “after watching her portrayal these last few days, I can say, with the utmost confidence, that she could easily kick all of your asses”

    Way to win fans and influence people!

  37. Trish (aka whovian) Said:

    Chev,

    See. I shoulda known better to argue with your infinite wisdom! HA! I am going to swallow my pride (but I’m hungry so it’s OK) and say I agree with you, after all. I like Pete as a friend of Sam’s as well. It’s weird because David Deluise is now on the Disney channel as a wizard or something?! Maybe I was dreaming that show up. Anyway… I also loved Michael on Gilmore Girls, too.

    I’m honestly not sure how I feel about Wormhole Extreme… I haven’t watched it in a while. But I remember enough to see what you mean if you didn’t like him. No real argument there, then.

    Therefore, I hereby I take back my earlier disagreement. 😀

    Trish

    P.S. I also apolgoize for spelling Urgo incorrectly. I only caught it right after I clicked “submit”. Darn those typos! 😛

    Infinite wisdom eh? LOL I’m not sure about that.

    David was great at Liz and TJ’s wedding. That casting really worked. I’m smiling as I remember that song at the start of the ceremony. Classic! I’m just in the middle of Season 7 at the moment.

    Just between you and me 🙂 …..There was one shining light through Wormhole Extreme – Willie Garson. He was cool.

    I wish WordPress had Preview. I’m always doing typos.

    Cheers, Chev
    p.s. I just found out what a whovian was – I know, shocking isn’t it?

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